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Did You Know..?

Behavior Checker supports the new public health movement of preventing toxic stress in children’s lives to improve their health, learning and behavior by helping parents and caregivers manage children’s common behavioral issues through evidence-based strategies that develop consistent, caring, supportive and protective relationships with children.

Here are quick links to recent scientific studies in health, learning and behavior that support this movement and many of the principles forming the foundation of Behavior Checker. 

  • A study in Science in March, 2015 showed the positive effects of good childcare on people in later life. Researchers learned that adults who had received stimulating and appropriate childcare in their earliest days of life had cognitive abilities that were stronger than those who had not. They were also notably healthier, showing that good early childcare is essential for children. Learn more...

  • An article in the July 2015 publication of The American Journal of Public Health showed that social skills were better predictors of adult success than academic skills. Learn more...

  • A study by Duke Medicine researchers found that children with social and emotional problems who did not receive the proper help early in their lives were at high risk for problems as adults. Pediatricians need to help parents identify and help resolve early childhood emotional problems before they permanently handicap children. Learn more...

  • When parents spank their children for misbehavior, they stop their children at the lowest level of moral development. The children are interested in avoiding the punishment, not in doing what is good or right. Discipline with Love and Limits, by Jerry L. Wyckoff, Ph. D., and Barbara C. Unell, Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2015, presents new brain research findings on the effects of spanking and threats on children. For more information...

  • When kindergarten teachers are surveyed about their students, they say that the biggest problem they face is children who don’t know how to manage their tempers or calm themselves down after provocation. Find out more in Discipline with Love and Limits, by Jerry L. Wyckoff, Ph. D., and Barbara C. Unell, Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2015.

  • Depression is the “common cold” of mental health, and it is particularly prevalent among teens. The teen years are fraught with changes in the body and brain, and it is during this unstable time that depression is most likely to strike. Learn more...

  • Toxic stress is, perhaps, the most devastating problem facing today’s children. The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a warning against toxic stress and its lifelong affects on the physical and emotional health of children. Learn more...

  • A study published in Pediatrics, July 2015, showed that moms get little help from the medical community on childhood behavior problems. The study suggests that more is needed from pediatricians on how to respond to childhood behavioral issues. Learn more...

  • We encourage you to go to The Center on the Developing Child website, where, according to the Center, "This three-part video series from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Learn more...

  • In a new policy statement in November 2018, The American Academy of Pediatrics warned that "aversive disciplinary strategies, including all forms of corporal punishment and yelling or shaming children are minimally effective in the short-term and not effective in the long-term.  With new evidence, researchers link corporal punishment to an increased risk of negative behavioral, cognitive, psycho-social and emotional outcomes for children." Learn more...

  • An approach to enhancing parent-child relationships in pediatric primary care

    The current state of science suggests that safe, responsive, and nurturing parent-child relationships early in children’s lives promotes healthy brain and child development and protection against lifelong disease by reducing toxic stress and promoting foundational social-emotional health. Pediatric healthcare providers (HCP) have a unique opportunity to foster these relationships. However, such a role requires a shift in pediatric healthcare from a focus only on children to one that includes families and communities as well as the inclusion of children’s social and emotional health with their physical health. To foster healthy parent-child relationships, HCPs must develop the expertise to integrate approaches that support family’s socio-emotional health into pediatric primary care. This article suggests ways in which pediatric HCPs can integrate a focus on parental reflective functioning into their clinical work, helping parents to understand some of the thoughts and feelings that underlie their children’s behavior. Learn more...

The authors and Raised with Love and Limits Foundation disclaim responsibility for any harmful consequences, loss, injury or damage associated with the use and application of information or advice contained in these prescriptions and on this website. These protocols are clinical guidelines that must be used in conjunction with critical thinking and critical judgment.